Goodbye photography …

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What are the odds of having a camera in your hand and finding a scene like this? That’s way too much effort in real life.

It has finally dawned on me that the whole idea of trying to photograph wildlife is preposterous.

How could I possibly add anything to the already well populated world of wildlife photography. If you don’t believe me, type the name of any wild creature into your favourite web search engine and watch for absolutely amazing photos to populate your screen. What was I thinking?

So goodbye photography and hello internet image borrowing (stealing is such a harsh word and really has no place in modern society). I have to say my new approach is a gift that just keeps on giving.

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It’s easy to crop out that barely visible logo in the bottom right corner to make the photo all mine … wait a minute that’s my logo!!

There used to be hours of boredom followed by a brief adrenaline rush while spotting an animal in near darkness. Now I get an energy rush every time Google loads another page of wildlife keepers. It’s a constant high without mosquitoes.

I must confess, it’s really hard to top the satisfaction of stealing someone’s else’s photo. First there’s the quick hunt, then there’s the fast find and finally there’s that special thrill when I crop out the photographer’s logo to make that winning photo all mine. I really am developing a unique skill set that will help me in most other areas of my life.

My photography borrowing hobby has changed my world. No more cataloguing and processing hundreds of images and the photos are so much better. I’m now able to find all those unique looks and special settings. Gone are all the bad jokes about never finding polar bears – they are all just a click away.

I’m so excited about all those wonderful borrowed photos I now call mine. I think they are worthy of putting in slideshows set to borrowed music. Maybe I can even sell them as my very own creations! Life is good.

Krahnpix note: There are risks involved with writing an entire post sarcastically, particularly for readers whose first language is not English. I decided to do it anyway. My inspiration for this post was photographers who are quick to claim copyright on their photography while ignoring the same rights for musicians. It just seemed to lend itself to sarcasm. 

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Latest Comments

  1. Joe Valencia says:

    I love it!

    Like

  2. Jessica says:

    I worried for a moment that you were serious about giving up 🙂 I’m glad that’s not the case, and can appreciate both the topic and your sarcasm!

    Like

  3. Stefano says:

    Sadly, you make a very good point. Problem is that, despite all copyright symbols and legends, many people believe that whatever they find on the Net is up for grabs… Once someone even emailed me to compliment me on an image of mine that that someone liked so much that he grabbed it from my (previous) website to use as his computer’s desktop – and he meant that as a compliment… 😦

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      As technology makes this all easier and as more people believe that what is on the Net is theirs, it will be interesting to see where this all goes. Often for corrections in society, the pendulum needs to swing way over before it corrects or finds a new balance.

      Like

  4. Phil Lanoue says:

    Your new plan for wildlife photography is absolutely brilliant! How do I know?!
    By lifting your moose photos from here I just made major headlines for getting the first known photo of a moose in South Carolina USA ever!! You can’t believe (or maybe you can) what this has done for my reputation! And you are right, it was so easy. A right click save makes me an instant local hero! Woo Hoo! Thanks so much for the super advice! Wow!
    Well enough talk of this, I’m off now to do an image search for leopards. Wait until people around the Myrtle Beach SC area find out that leopards can be found roaming wild along the beach!
    Oh, one more thing…would you please post a polar bear image soon? I’d love to have the first ‘sighting’ of one of those around here. 😀

    Like

  5. RobynG says:

    Your sarcasm was much appreciated Lyle! Unfortunately it is all too true… Enjoy the day!

    Like

  6. Mary says:

    Perfectly stated. Grabs are so easy w/no consideration to the lonely photographer whose time and effort goes unnoticed because someone else wants to make a buck, do it the easy way and with no morals / value-system that they operate under. You have some incredible shots that tracked miles and miles on the soles of your shoes, managing patience for time to stand still as you wait for the perfect image to unfold in front of your eyes. When will society mature and grow up – were we always this uncivilized or is it slipping just at a faster clip with easy access to others work through the internet. Bless your Heart Lyle, I hope you continue to give us the world through your lens.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Thanks so much. It seems there are different codes that people operate under and technology has made it all so easy. I will keep discovering the world through my lens and people like you make sharing it fun.

      Like

  7. dweezer19 says:

    Your message was very clear in English. 😉

    Like

  8. Hanna says:

    Normally I’m not fond of sarcasm but you did well with your message.
    All the best,
    Hanna

    Like

  9. niasunset says:

    Exactly different… wonderful post. Thank you, love, nia

    Like

  10. Cornel A. says:

    Until a while ago, let’s say two years, I was judging photos and photographers so easy… I liked only some photos, and yes, the rest of all were in my opinion just … I don’t know, ‘attempts’ to photography(even if now I realize how good were some of them).
    After I started to take photography seriously (well, I don’t know if I can say this when I have a point and shoot camera, but let’s say I can), after I started to go alone into the woods, to search birds on plains, after I went through bushes to find interesting spots, I realized how many good things I was loosing when I was judging other photos. I realize how amazing is to hear the birds flying above you, I realized how interesting is to met in flesh and bones some animals (a few months ago I was waiting some bids when, suddenly, a fox appeared in front of me. I was scared, first time when saw a real fox next to me, but guess what, she was scared too. Perhaps sounds childish, but this is an experience which you will never have when you are just judging others photos, or even worse: when one steals other’s work).
    There are so many things which all those who steal photos (or judge them as if they are the masters of photography – even if they never been alone into the wild-) will never know. They even can’t imagine.
    I liked this article.
    And, one more time, even if I’m not a pro photographer, I understand your point of view as much as my experience allow me to do it.
    🙂

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      You make some really good points!

      It’s so easy to be critical of others but so much more rewarding and challenging to actually get involved and make the photos yourself. There are so many amazing experiences available to those who venture out and have wonderful encounters with wildlife. I love your fox story and it makes your point so well.

      It isn’t the camera that determines whether someone takes photography seriously … and I know you do. It sounds like it has been very rewarding. By the way, if your definition of professional is someone who sells images for an income, then I’m an amateur as well. Happy shooting!

      Like

      • Cornel A. says:

        About my definition of a professional. When I wrote this above “I’m not a pro photographer…” I had in my mind that a pro has camera bodies, has many lenses, tripods, filters and other things. And he also can control ISO, focal length, exposure, white balance and so on(I just wrote some things I read about on internet even if I can’t apply them).
        🙂
        I enjoy reading your articles.

        Like

  11. dapontephotography says:

    I am laughing my a off 🙂 indeed it would be so easy but where is the challenge in that, the adrenaline rush?
    Oh yeah, the not getting caught part!
    Then the fun comes to an end when you receive a cease and desist notice or better yet get your internet privilege revoked. 😦

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I so love to hear that I helped someone laugh – thanks for making my day. Your description of the hazards are so apt. There’s lots of “fun” down that road even it takes a while.

      Like

  12. adinparadise says:

    Love the way you wrote this, Lyle. 🙂 Your photos are exquisite.

    Like

  13. Sue (Mac's Girl) says:

    Great post, Lyle. How can anyone feel any sense of achievement from claiming someone else’s work as their own!

    Like

  14. Dana S. Hugh says:

    Well…that’s why perhaps I don’t bother myself with the “copyrights” and I’m only an amateur. Once someone presses upload/insert/browse he/she loses the right and no longer owns the picture/phrase. My way is do not make public those pictures which are really good. If I want to impresse a magazine or who knows use them for an exposition, i’ll send an email or just go with the print. JMHO.
    And not in the last, please do not steal 🙂 or stop taking shots.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Your way sounds like a good plan – I have heard of a number of people who use that approach. I’m still trying to get better and want to share my best photos so I post them with a watermark though it’s still limited in size. If a lot of money was at stake, perhaps I’d have to reconsider. It is a challenging area. By the way, if your definition of professional is someone who sells images for an income, then I’m an amateur as well. I really appreciate you sharing your thots. And yes the photography will continue.

      Like

  15. outdoorpictures says:

    What matters is not the picture itself but the way to get it!

    Like

  16. Seenorway says:

    You know. Lyle, that you wouldn’t be finding that many photos ouit there if it wasn’t for guys like you? Snapshots, yes, but quality photos of wildlife – no! Then there is the sheer joy of sharing pictuires an re-living the moments of when the photo was actually taken. Not many people out there have the same opportunity as have you. And even if they had the opportunity,,they probably wouldn’t have the knowledge nor the patience to get shots just like these.
    Then there is the satisfaction of a perfect shot, the one you have been dreaming about, which is your reward.
    As for stealing from the internet, in most cases a piece of cake, it really doesn’t give you anything? And presenting such photos to be your own (I don’t think you ever would) would only give you a bad taste in the mouth, and some day a bill would surely arrive through the mail . . .?
    I’d advise you to keep on like you do (as long as you thing it’s a rewarding hobby). That’s where it eventually ends.

    Like

  17. Brian says:

    Lyle, you slay me!!

    Like

  18. babsje says:

    Lyle, spot-on post. I was concerned that the impetus for this one was that your work had been misappropriated – say it ain’t so?

    Another analogy besides your great music one is people lifting quotes to put in their blog and not linking back to the original author. When I quote, I try to link back to a published work that a reader can click on and then purchase if so inclined. I feel that the original writer should get credit and be able to profit if we are using their words to enrich one of our posts. Its the fair thing to do. While some of my early posts don’t do this consistently, I’ve chosen to always do it going forward if I’m going to quote the words or lyrics of another. The best way, of course, is to just be original, and quote only myself. 🙂

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      It ain’t so. I was not reacting to a specific incident that affected me.

      Thanks for adding the thots about quotes. Good points. I like the part about quoting myself.

      Respect for creative or intellectual ownership seems to be sliding somewhat. I hope it’s a trend that doesn’t continue.

      Like

  19. Gunta says:

    I don’t have a thing to add to this. You made the point rather well!

    Like

  20. Mike Powell says:

    It may be sarcasm, but it is a sad truth that some folks do this sort of thing. It’s a difficult for me to understand their motivation. Wildlife photography is certainly challenging and frustrating, but it is incredibly rewarding when I manage to get a shot that I like–it may not be as technically good as many of the images I can find in a Google search, but I’m ok with that–the only one with whom I am competing is me.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      It turns out it’s fun to wrap truth up in sarcasm. I’m with you on the confusion regarding the motivation but that is often hard to figure out. Your approach is probably the most rewarding.

      Like

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