A story without an end …

My blogging journey thus far has been a fascinating experience with many surprises and an elusive next step. Along the way I have recognized a number of phases.

Dream phase

Initially I had this crazy idea to share my photos and slowly that dream morphed into a decision to blog. It reminded me of a time when I asked a photographer my age at a photography course if he had a website. “Oh no,” he replied, I only show them to my mom.”

My research lead me to using WordPress. What they offered for free was amazing but there were still some frustrations in figuring out how everything worked and putting it all together. I wanted to make a good first impression in case anyone besides my mom wandered by!

Launch phase

_MG_4005

I had all these fresh photos from a trip to Hawaii so it was time to lift my head up and start a blog. This was the first image I posted. I called it oblivious.

With my first post finished, there was nothing left to do but hit the publish button and wince. I think the latter was mostly about the fact I was making a big commitment!

After that, I settled in to nothing but the sound of crickets. Whenever someone stopped by, it was an unusual gift. I would check the stats hourly just to see if there were any more.

Familiarity phase

I decided to post twice a week until I could get a good audience. The funny thing is that 181 posts and 20 months later I’m still doing it. My initial thot was that it was too difficult to maintain quality posts with greater frequency and I still believe few successfully maintain that standard.

I chuckled to myself when I finally removed the requirement that I review all comments before they went live. It turned out there wasn’t exactly a stampede!

I got into the routine of posting and even started to enjoy hitting the publish button. Along the way I connected with some amazing bloggers on my posts and theirs. There were also friends and connections from Facebook who stopped by to say hello.

Surging phase

_MG_3384

In my second post I explained that the mongoose had been brought to Hawaii to control the rat population. Of course this type of human intervention usually ends badly. In this case, the minor miscalculation was that the mongoose sleeps at nite when the rats are active. Oops.

A few people told me I had a great blog and I wondered if it could be true.

The traffic steadily increased and there were some inspiring comments.

I reached new milestones and WordPress featured my blog a couple of times sending my stats soaring. This was starting to get easy! I even entertained thots of getting enough readers to get a few dollars from advertising. And to think I have occasionally been viewed as less than optimistic!

Roller coaster phase

Unfortunately my stats nose dived when most of the visitors from WordPress features disappeared after their initial visits. Hmm maybe this wasn’t so easy. I would make photos I really liked and then spent a lot of time writing corresponding posts. I was surprised when they didn’t seem to get much response. Then I would write a tide-me-over post and it would get much more reaction. Confusing!

I learned quite a few other things along the way. It’s not easy continually growing the number of readers and perhaps that was an unrealistic expectation. August is a slow month, WordPress users can like posts without opening them, people taking the time to comment is special and regular commenters regularly disappear. I still miss them. I figured out months later that some of them had left the blogosphere. Then a new set of bloggers signed up. I duly noted that when others decided to take a blogging break, they usually didn’t start again.

Doubting phase

Somewhere along the way I began to question why I was doing the blog – usually on days when ideas for new posts seemed elusive.

Over time I had changed my measures of success for the blog from the number of daily views, to the number of likes, to the quality of the comments, to quality connections with people, to deciding this was just a writing outlet for me and then back through the list again. By now making money was nowhere close to this list!

At the same time I was often reminded of all the wonderful people I had met and the good interaction with folks from many places in the world. They seemed to enjoy my photos, perspective and occasionally even my quirky sense of humour.

Next phase

At the beginning of a new year, I am in a reflective mood. I’m not sure about where I’m going with the blog, if anywhere. I still have photos and stories I want to share, but after that? Do I need a better measure of success? More focus?

Perhaps you have some suggestions or advice? Or perhaps some of you have been blogging longer and know of other phases?

_MG_3388

So what lies ahead?

Advertisements

Latest Comments

  1. rickbraveheart says:

    Happy new year Lyle. This is a wonderful post about a subject that I believe touches the heart of any committed blogger. For most of us it is a struggle to balance time spent blogging with our passion (like our love for photography), our work, and most importantly, our family and ourselves. In the beginning I believe we all share a fascination with the numbers (and some bloggers make lots of $ by having high stat’s) but then, as we gain followers who post meaningful comments, I believe most of us know that it’s the connection with those followers that is the most rewarding. The dilemma for most of us I suspect is knowing your ideas/photos are of value to others by their comments when, compared to many other things in life which are judged by how much money our work brings in. Your heart, personality, passion, and your wonderful photo skills shine in every post you write. When I read your post I feel as if I’m sitting across the table from you in conversation. That, for me, makes for a magical blog. What becomes difficult, I think, is how the time required for blogging (and maintaining connections with our followers) can begin to interfere with time required for family, sleep and even for ourself. After four years, I am becoming more aware that if I need to cut back on blogging in order to spend time elsewhere, committed followers, who are usually other bloggers themselves and who face the same challenges, understand completely and welcome me back with open arms.

    For me, as a professional veteran landscape photographer and blog writer (and overall good fellow!) I can tell you that your blog is terrific and one that I enjoy immensely. You post spectacular, professional images and well written text that shares knowledge and most importantly, a sense of yourself to the reader. Listen to your heart though and if you think it would help, perhaps try cut back just a little in new posts to continue building that amazing portfolio of your work. And always feel free to write me more about this offline. My sincere best wishes for a healthy and happy new year.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Thank you so much for your perspective. It obviously comes from travelling many miles down that same road. I found your comment about judging the value of something by the quality of the comments as opposed to money quite insightful. I will need to think more about that.

      I continually strive for a conversational style and I’m more than pleased to hear that connects with you as well as the other nice things you said about the blog. Thank you. I think I will be cutting back on new posts and will be listening to my heart and pondering next steps. All good suggestions.

      I am so pleased that you are back in the blogosphere. I wish you well in your blogging and other endeavours in the new year. I will be in touch offline.

      Like

  2. mflahertyphoto says:

    I enjoy your blog Lyle. I’ve come to the conclusion that blogging is an outlet and if you have something going it can be a minor supplementary marketing tool. Very few bloggers can actually make money at it. I can’t, mostly because the types of blogs I do aren’t very popular with today’s twitter/facebook/instagram crowd. For the most part, I can’t go that shallow. And I think you’re similar. But that doesn’t mean it’s not worthwhile. Some bloggers start a new blog with a completely different focus when they come to a point where they’re questioning the value of what they’re doing. Not saying you’re doing that…

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Your conclusions are interesting. It does seem sometimes like we’re living in a 140-character world where reading something of a little more substance may not be popular. It then becomes important to determine what makes the blog worthwhile and using that for a measure of success. I continue to work through the process of changing my approach. I appreciate your input.

      Like

  3. Jocelyne says:

    You described so perfectly these phases Lyle, I so recognized myself in them ! I don’t know for how long you’ve been blogging, I started my blog 2 years and 4 months ago and I don’t look at my stats as often as I used too. Like you said, interaction with people is more important and what makes blogging so fun and interesting. I never ask myself where I’m going with my blog, I don’t have a goal, I simply enjoy posting and what I love most is all the friends I’ve made and all the interactions we have, and that is the most important thing. I really love your blog, you always make me laugh or smile, and your photos are amazingly beautiful. I hope you will continue with your blog, your work is appreciated by many and I would certainly miss seeing your beautiful photos 🙂

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I’m a little behind you since I’ve been at this for a year and 8 months. I have been surprised to hear how many other people like you have had similar experiences with blogging.

      I’m glad you enjoy my blog and that the humour connects – it is sometimes an acquired taste!

      I am going to try taking a more easy going approach. That seems to working for you and others that have commented on this post. I really appreciate your comments.

      Like

  4. Scott Marshall says:

    Well Lyle firstly Happy New Year to you – you blog posts always have some much more than great photography – there is always some dry humour and maybe even a deeper element – so I am a fan. I get the phases of blogging totally and I myself am much happier now that I post and respond when the mood takes me or the capacity is there. The tail end of last year was simply way too busy for me to be productive. When it comes down to it as Phil says it should be enjoyable and for me the cross fertilisation with balanced creative people is by far the best aspect for me. I can only imagine how much more energy is expanded in generating your posts with both images and words ~ versus my own simple image and tagging but they are always engaging and always thought provoking. May you and your family have a happy and healthy 2014.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      And I hope you and yours have a great new year as well.

      You are right about the energy expenditure. Sometimes the posts come quickly but other times they circle around a lot before landing. And I’m not above fussing to get everything the way I want it. Sometimes that leads me to the next phase but I think I need to move more to your general approach. I love your phrase, “cross fertilisation with balanced creative people,” though I have to question my own balance at times. There is lot to be gained by the connection with others.

      I’m glad you’re a fan. I really appreciate the comments and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the banter we’ve had over time. All the best with your blogging travels.

      Like

  5. Phil Lanoue says:

    I think you are going about it the right way and with a good and appropriate attitude. Those of us that do blog have to occasionally reminds that it isn’t a job. If it starts to feel more like work then pleasant enjoyment then it’s time to reassess what the purpose of the whole thing is. (sorry I seem to be babbling) Anyway I enjoy your blog, your photos, your sense of humor and perspective and I can see others certainly do as well.
    Please stick around, because if you suddenly decided to bail on the whole concept I believe you would be missed by many.
    (sorry again if I’m getting sappy, but I think you know what I mean)

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I think I know what you mean (no sappiness received) and I really appreciate the sentiment coming from you. This whole process has been helpful to reassess what I’m doing and hopefully restores a better perspective on this whole blogging journey. That likely means less focus on stats and more on just having fun with it.

      Like

  6. The Sicilian Housewife says:

    This is a really interesting post and I think all of us hobby bloggers must go through these phases, maybe cyclically.
    I sometimes wonder if it is worth all the time I put into writing my blog, but I have made friends with people online and I really do enjoy it. For a while I hoped my blog would be a good way to sell my self-published novel, but it isn’t. Now I just enjoy it for what it is.
    Your blog had me confused for a long time, because your photos are of such a high standard that I thought you were a professional photographer – I didn’t write the usual chatty comments because I thought you would find that stupid!!!
    Anyway I do hope you don’t stop sharing your fabulous photos. They give me so much enjoyment.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Enjoying it for it is sounds like a pretty sound theory and it’s a place I’m trying to find. It was interesting to me how many people seem to have had similar blogging phases.
      I have always enjoyed your comments and I’m glad to hear that enjoy the blog. My blog confuses me sometimes too only in different areas!

      Like

  7. Stefano says:

    Happy New Year, Lyle: to 365 more days of great photos! 🙂

    Like

  8. nliakos says:

    I’ve only recently discovered your blog, Lyle, so I still have a lot of back posts I plan to enjoy at my leisure. Your wildlife photography is really wonderful. I started my blog as a way to collect all the photos I was taking of trees, lakes, flowers, etc.in one place–otherwise they just disappeared in my Picasa account and I never looked at them again, and nobody else did, either. Little by little I have realized I should not post every picture I take (but I still post too many)! One of the best things about my little blog is that it’s been how I found bloggers like you, who have great cameras with big zoom lenses and great capabilities that my little point-and-shoot could never match, who take such awesome nature photos. Although I could never be in your class, I enjoy being part of this wonderful nature-photography blogging community.
    As for posting, I only post when I have photos to share, which may be daily in the summer or every few weeks in the winter.

    Like

  9. Honie Briggs says:

    The waxing and waning of the blog is a curious yet common experience. I think you know how much I appreciate your work. It is truly a gift to those who happen upon your blog and I think that as long as it gives you pleasure to share it on this platform, keep those posts coming, Man! I too find that a refresh is needed from time to time to keep me challenged and engaged. The posting every day phase became a posting less frequently phase. Ranting less, reflecting more (two very closely related phases) I have also become more selective about making comments. This too may be just a phase.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I appreciate those thots. It reminds me again that I really don’t do plodding that well so a little waxing and waning in different phases is probably a good thing. Staying challenged and engaged is an important part of the experience and may be helped by focusing on different things at different times. It is all a bit curious.

      Like

  10. anotherday2paradise says:

    I just blog for the fun of it, Lyle. I grew my adinparadise blog for a couple of years, and then started over again. Now, after only a couple of months, I have a quarter the number of followers I had before, but still get comments from the same people. I think most of the other 600 or so, never even read or looked at my blog, so they were just superfluous. I hardly ever look at statistics, but when I do, I’m surprised at which posts get the most reads. Good luck this year with your blog. I love your pics. 🙂

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      It sounds like you have good strategy to accomplish what you want. I think I need to focus more clearly on what what I’m trying to accomplish while ignoring the stats as you do. Glad you like my photos.

      Like

  11. nbsinclair says:

    I would really miss your posts if you decided to stop blogging. Your photography is beautiful and with your writing you have the complete package! I like the wildlife subjects you pick and the way you frame them, both photographically and in your narratives. I don’t know how many blogs other people subscribe to or browse through. There are so many out there and I can’t imagine keeping up with more than a couple, unless your whole day was devoted to blog reading. So I think the preponderance of material accounts for some of what bloggers go through when they write but the stats are disappointing: too many blogs and not enough devoted readers. Personally, I would like to write more for myself and worry less about the audience. When I was writing, my biggest fan was my mom, which created some writer’s block as I anticipated her “that’s my kid” comments… I need to get over that 🙂 BTW – I often don’t send a comment because I will have read your post on my phone and it’s a hassle to type out a comment… but I STILL like the post! We need to develop telepathy comments.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I’m all for telepathy comments – surely WordPress could figure that out! I’m happy to hear from someone I don’t often hear from. I loved the mom comment.

      I’ve had a lot of fun going on the adventures, taking the photos and writing the narratives. It would be good to continue that. Perhaps I just need to reframe success for it to make sense in this phase. There certainly are a lot of blogs out there and I’m honoured that you take the time to read mine. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

      Like

  12. gimpet says:

    I do it for me and don’t care about the stats. In the end, that is the only goal that will really keep you blogging. People will always come and go. Publish what you love, when you get the inclination and you will never regret. I wish I had your photography talent, but to know that I can see amazing nature with a click on your post should make you realize that you show what most people will never see. So thank you from all of us.

    Like

  13. dda53 says:

    Blog and they will come.

    Like

  14. macmcguire says:

    Enjoyable read. I am new to the whole blogging thing and am still getting the hang of it. So far my goal is to just share some photos and hope someone out there enjoys them as much as I do.

    I don’t follow a lot of blogs or read a lot of other’s posts (mainly for reasons of time), but yours is one of the ones I read and enjoy regularly.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I’m pleased to hear that my blog is one of your chosen few! I have to say that this whole blogging thing has been one of the more interesting ventures. Enjoy the ride!

      Like

  15. Jeff | Planet Bell says:

    I was going to type this : “I feel like I could have written this post, as it pretty much sums up everything I’ve done so far.” Then I looked through the comments of the others, and they are saying the same thing. In a humorous and thought-provoking manner, you have summed up what many of us feel and think.

    Maybe you could start a blogging support group?

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      See that’s why it’s so much fun to throw ideas out there and see what happens. I would never have thot of a blogging support group despite musing about starting numerous other ones.

      Like

  16. westerner54 says:

    Another great post…not only because of your good thots (see what I did there?) but because of the really insightful and interesting comments this generated. It’s reassuring to see that others have exactly the same questions that I do regarding this whole blogging thing. When I take a moment and scroll through my old posts I realize that one of the biggest benefits for me is that my blog serves as a personal log (a plog?) and I do get a lot of pleasure out of reliving those moments.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I never miss it when someone takes up my torch on thots. I sense gathering momentum:)

      I think you may be on to something with the plog and the entire concept makes a lot of sense. There’s nothing like a photo and a well-told story to bring memories rushing back. Sometimes they even get better with time.

      Like

  17. melodylowes says:

    Eerily familiar. I have gone through all these phases and more – and back again, wondering where the significance is, wondering if there is even a standard by which one can measure that elusive being we like to call ‘success’. I know I sure enjoy your take on your beautiful world, and would miss your posts. Do we write for fame, or enjoyment? Do we challenge ourselves to get that incredible shot to share and grow in our craft, or to make money? The pendulum will likely always swing. As long as it passes through the region called ‘enjoyable’, I think it’s worth the effort. ?! 🙂

    Like

  18. Pam says:

    Do what you love, and the rest will fall into place. If you are happy when you press publish, someone out there will be happy to read it too.

    Like

  19. Susan Drury says:

    I think the best measure of success is how you feel after completing a blog. I also have a blog (that I don’t write as often as I should). I started it as you did: a place to post photos and write of what I’ve experienced. It’s a journal for me to remember and share something that affected me, and write in a genre different than from my novel writing. If you have more to share, then share it – for yourself and to give pleasure to others. You don’t need to think beyond that. 🙂 Susan

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      How I feel after completing a blog is a great measure of success. I will definitely have to incorporate that concept. As for not doing thinking beyond that, I don’t think I would be capable of that given my mental disposition:) Thanks for giving me a great idea to ponder.

      Like

  20. Mind Margins says:

    I think my blogging journey parallels your own. It’s been a roller coaster. Putting out a quality post, with photos, is very time consuming with little return other than the comments and friendship from other bloggers. Most days that’s enough. Some days I wonder why I bother, if only because of the time factor. I’ve met some wonderful people here, however, and that’s what keeps me going. That, and the fact that I love to write. Your blog has always been one of my favorites.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Those are good observations especially about the time commitment and the wonderful people. I would probably add that each time we put a little of ourselves out there so it feels like it’s something of value. I’m quite pleased to hear that I made your favourite list.

      Like

  21. owenslaterphotography says:

    Hi Lyle,
    Your phases could be applied to really any job or life in general. My motto is just do what makes you happy and the rest will fall into place. Happy New Year and all the best for 2014!

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I hadn’t thought that those phases could be applied so generally but that makes sense. I hope your new year is filled with more of the wonderful adventures you keep regaling us with on your blog.

      Like

  22. Mary says:

    Wonderful post and really reflects a lot of where I’ve been. I’m still deciding what my ultimate purpose is. So far it has had good traffic, met some great blogging friends, fantastic connections w/people of similar interests, a great learning tool for artists/photographers/writers, a very good way to get your name out there in whatever endeavor one might be working towards, and it has keep me on a disciplined path. I’m ready for my next steps . . . not sure what they are, so I understand your thoughts. What I can say, is that I’ve loved seeing your photographs and writings – a real joy and I hope that even if you back down on the # of posts/week, you don’t abandon your fan base – what you are doing is keeping you sharp in your field.

    All the best in 2014 and success is already stepping inside your doorway, what will you be doing with it?

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      It’s great to hear of your successes and I hope you find those next steps. All the best in another year.
      I’m glad you enjoy what I do and I really appreciate your comments. You are certainly correct about it helping to keep me sharp. I’m still pondering what to do but posting less often is one of the options.

      Like

  23. Joyce Gamsby-Kesling says:

    Just keep thinking! 😎

    Like

  24. Mike Bizeau says:

    Lyle, I like this post, alot. Your ability to connect and relate in a humorous way the experiences that many of us out here experience is a genuine talent. A voice of reason and humor in a world where the amateur is more serious than the professional. I often find myself reading your posts and nodding in agreement. I will end my blogging when I find myself more concerned with the blogging than the experiences I seek to experience and then to document/share on the blog. Cheers and have a creative 2014. Mike

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I’m so pleased to hear that this post and others connect with you. I expected that there may have been others in the same boat as me when I wrote this post but was surprised by the number who felt exactly the same.
      I love your description of a “voice of reason and humour” – that’s definitely something worthy to I could aspire to be!
      It sounds like you have a good criteria for ending blogging. I will seriously consider adopting or adapting it.
      A creative 2014 is a great wish and I hope you get a double measure.

      Like

  25. Anarette.com says:

    I just do what I feel is right at the moment. My goal is 365 posts in 365 days, after that all bets are off. It has been a nice journey so far and I have met some nice bloggers on the way. That is what keeps me going. Wishing you happy travels.

    Like

  26. Michelle at The Green Study says:

    I have just been through a phase of wrestling with this myself. I did decide that if I were to continue blogging, that I needed to be more engaged. It served the initial purpose of making me write regularly, but now that I have several offline projects in the works, I wondered if I should continue to expend so much energy maintaining an online presence. Ultimately the social aspect and connections make the difference for me. I work from home, so it provides me a sense of community I would not otherwise have.
    I love your photographs, but in combination with your subtle, wry humor, your blog is truly an enjoyable read. I could envision this combination of pictures and commentary as an eventual book or paid column in an online/offline serial publication. But we have to all figure out our own bliss (and I choked a bit using that buzz word, since I have never been a blissful person). For me, the joy lies in finding new challenges for myself. If I can do that in the context of maintaining a blog, all the better.
    Good luck as you find your way in the new year!

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Your journey is a fascinating one and I’m watching it all unfold with interest. The sense of community you mentioned is definitely an important factor to consider.
      I really appreciate your comments about my blog – that’s exactly what I have strived to accomplish. And thanks for the chuckle over your personal commentary on bliss while making an excellent point. Apparently I don’t have a lock on wry humour.
      Laying out this post was an important part of the process for me. I appreciate you taking the time to thotfully engage with it. I think it is helping me find my way.

      Like

  27. Dana S. Hugh says:

    Well…I’m clueless regarding to the financial advantage. My blog is just a hobby and I cannot dare to beat any records of the views. I do wonder if some one can win something as they invest a good among of time (post, feedback) and perhaps money to keep the blog updated with fresh pictures or fresh stories or even trips.
    On the other side, I know that a blog with a good traffic can be a plus and something that recommends a person for a future job or collaboration. I’m talking about photographers or essayists and their start.
    Then I have to be honest and say I do have doubts regarding my hobby and if the time spent for that, is worth something. I find that the bond which has been created with some of WP bloggers and those beautiful stories and their captures shared, deserve my time.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Sometimes I think it is a strange thing that we do but it has it’s own unique rewards. For most of us it will not be monetary but the incredible opportunity to connect with people not in our usual sphere and be exposed to some amazing blogs. Like usual, I appreciate your comments.

      Like

  28. Mike Powell says:

    You pose some really challenging questions, Lyle, serious questions, questions with which many of us have struggled, but few have examined as analytically as you have. What is success? How do you define it and how do you measure it? Is success a constant or is it constantly changing? Is the familiar and the comfortable enough or do you feel driven to push on to higher heights? I wish I could offer some sage advice about the best way forward for you, but I am a relative neophyte when it comes to photography, to blogging, and to wildlife. All I can give is my selfish, biased perspective–I would like for you to continue posting beautiful images of wildlife, surrounded by wonderful prose, tinged with a slightly warped sense of humor. You set the bar really high in the quality of your photos and the freshness of your writing, yet you are willing to provide encouragement and inspiration to guys like me who are not yet at that same level. The choice is yours, of course, but my hope is that you will stay the course and continue to inspire and entertain us.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I really appreciate those thotful and encouraging words. I’ve always enjoyed the fact that you seemed to find pleasure in my odd sense of humour. However, I must take exception to your neophyte description. If that were true, why do find myself wishing I had taken your last shot of the otter?

      Like

  29. outdoorpictures says:

    Happy an successful New Year- I recommendation fro you is to continue the same way. It is perfect!

    Like

  30. Karolyn Cooper says:

    Good questions. I have no answers.
    I was in the familiarity stage, with a few surges along the way, when I moved countries. Maybe my expat blog could become a “back home” blog, but I am not sure yet. I’m going to stay in the blogosphere reading and commenting for a while before I decide.

    Like

  31. kerlund74 says:

    Magnificent nature photos!

    Like

  32. rachel bar says:

    I’m still not blogging but for some unknown reason I decided to open your post.
    When I used to read your posts I so enjoyed the wonderful combination of the photographs with the writings. It was a rare combination.

    Whichever decision you’d make it would be fine.

    Happy new year!

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      What a pleasant surprise to hear from you again! You were the first person I thot of when I mentioned the bloggers I miss. I appreciate your comments to put it all in perspective. I hope you have a great year.

      Like

  33. Mandy says:

    I think I’m stuck in the “familiarity stage” with occasional bouts of “roller coaster” and “doubt”, however I enjoy it . I find a lot of people read but do not comment and I am always surprised when someone says to me out of the blue that they liked such and such a post. I also think the blog helps my fledgling writing business – I know at least one job it has helped secure. But at the end of the day it is as Gunta says: friends are better than statistics.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      It’s a good reminder about people reading and not commenting. The commenters are the exceptional ones even though we wish it would be the other way around. Glad to hear that your writing business is being helped by the blog.

      Like

  34. vanbraman says:

    My stats are on the down side of the roller coaster the last couple of months. I struggle as to whether I want to try and improve my traffic or just write what I want to write about. I am opting to just let my mind wander where it wants and not worry too much about the stats.

    Like

  35. Gunta says:

    I’m afraid I can’t be much help. My thinking probably stops with: as long as I’m enjoying the ride, I’ll continue – if it ever gets to be a drag, I’ll stop. Stats are weird since they often don’t make much sense. The most enjoyable part for me has been the bloggers I’ve connected to with similar interests. I’ve even met a few along the way. I think friends are better than statistics. 😉

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Like usual, you have an interesting perspective that cuts to the core of the issue – friends are most certainly better than statistics! And stats are most certainly weird. I will remember those.

      Like

  36. ksbeth says:

    great post, and i have no idea, i am constantly going through phases myself ) for now, i’m enjoying it, especially the give and take and connections with others, i think the human factor is what keeps me going. that, and i love to write. best, beth

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Glad you enjoyed the post. The human factor and enjoying writing are two factors in the equation. Sorry to hear you’re going through phases too – perhaps its inevitable.

      Like

I'd love to hear what you are thinking ...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s