_B5A2134

Mother where art thou?

Imagine you are an eaglet …

Your first memory is being entombed in dark, tight, smelly quarters. Mustering all your strength, you finally manage to crack your prison shell and stagger out to a cruel world.

_B5A2167

Wet, miserable and a little freaked out by the height.

You blink your eyes and catch the first glimpse of a rather fierce looking creature who turns out to be your mother. Before you even have time to wonder how that happened, she is gone.

So there are you all alone in what might be described as rustic accommodations. It seems the builders gave up on the place before installing a roof. The obvious disadvantage is getting soaked when it rains which seems to happen a lot.

There is no Internet, no smart phone and only raw meat delivered occasionally by your wild-looking mother.

Your legs finally get strong enough to take a couple of steps. You wander to the edge of the nursery and take a glimpse of the neighbourhood. It’s an upscale forest at the edge of a lake in a national park. Not too shabby!

Then you make the mistake of looking down … and nearly pass out. The height of your accommodation is beak dropping! How did it get up here? You try hard not to envision dropping like a cannon ball straight for the distant rocks below. There is not a guardrail in sight. It seems either humans or eagles have this whole safety thing turned on its head.

There also appears to be no wildlife family services to deal with your delinquent parents. Where are they? Other mothers at least provide milk or some affection. You just hang around enduring your cold, wet and miserable life while calling out for someone, anyone for a rescue from this improbably high prison. Your cries echo through the valley.

No one comes.

You close your eyes and the unpleasant realities begin to fade. Suddenly your mother appears, landing quickly on the nest. Overjoyed, you dance around the nest only to have her bump into you. Suddenly you find your balance slipping in slow motion over the edge. In an instant, the rocky shore below starts rising with increasing speed …

Is it a dream?

_B5A2094

Please help! I’m lonely.

Advertisements

Latest Comments

  1. Scott Marshall says:

    your usual awesome brilliantness (no I am confident it is not a word) especially love the rain streaks in the second shot

    Like

  2. Phil Lanoue says:

    These are outstanding! Really enjoyed seeing the youngster.

    Like

  3. westerner54 says:

    You nailed it with this one! Hope this little guy made it to adulthood.

    Like

  4. Sreejith Nair says:

    These are incredible images, but, to be frank, your write up did steal the show 🙂

    The about section here, gave a hint of what’s in store 🙂

    Thank you so much for this entertaining post, Lyle .

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I really appreciate your comments. To let you in on a little secret, I thoroughly enjoy taking the photos but the writing actually gives me more satisfaction when it all comes together. Now what can I come up with next …

      Liked by 1 person

  5. babsje says:

    Outstanding composition, Lyle, love these photos.

    Like

  6. dweezer19 says:

    Now that’s just precious. I feel like I am right there!

    Like

  7. rickbraveheart says:

    What a fabulous series of “in the nest” nature photos, Lyle. I love the sequence you put together from the shot of the young one yelling for something to eat (reminded me of myself in the morning) to that eye-to-eye shot where it’s almost asking the viewer for something to nibble on. And, from an artistic perspective, your fabulous use of bokeh and lens vignetting was terrific and all brought the viewers eye directly to the main subject. For a guy stuck in the studio for three days, it was a breath of fresh air and a connection with nature. Many thanks my friend. ~ Rick

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Giving someone a breath of fresh air is a most satisfying pleasure, particularly when it brings back such wonderful memories for me. It was a fabulous experience photographing my first eaglet and it was a lot of fun to share. I really appreciate your thotful comments.

      Like

  8. Mary says:

    This is a great post Lyle – loved your narrative and great images of the little one. For some reason your blog has been turned off in my Reader, it’s back on and I’m able to enjoy your posts again.

    Like

  9. hannele says:

    That baby would probably be pretty unhappy if its parents came home with milk. Still, I love the story, and the photos are stunning, as usual! The framing and background in the last one are something special.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I am afraid I am hopelessly addicted to the fun of adding parts to the story that make no obvious sense. Who can resist?

      The last photo was born of necessity since I only had a small opening in the leaves to photograph the distant nest. What started as a problem ended up adding to the photo when I found the right spot.

      Thanks for your comments. I was quite excited to photograph my first eaglet.

      Like

  10. krikitarts says:

    Surely a hungry and bored young eaglet is more than happy for a parent to appear, however briefly, with a tasty morsel. But does it really mind waiting in the rain? Is it more patient and happier when the weather’s fine? What if it had to compete with a sibling? It seems to me that you have a keen insight into what may be going through this little one’s mind, and it occurs to me that you might well consider constructing a story (maybe a children’s book?) around the state of affairs from a fledgling’s perspective…

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I really appreciate that. I had an interesting time with a perspective that is undoubtedly false but fun. It’s fascinating how many ways the tale could be told. When I first started photographing the nest, I didn’t even realize there was a youngster there since it was so far away. When I came back I realized the mother was gone and this eaglet was all alone. Lift his head to the sky was a great moment to capture.

      Like

  11. Mandy says:

    Love this – one of my all time favourite posts; was giggling all through it.

    Like

  12. My Heartsong says:

    I love the look that you are getting in the latter shot, something like in the children’s book, “Are you my mother?” Beautiful eaglet, beautiful country.great story and photos.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I was fortunate to get some interesting looks from the little guy. It really is a gorgeous place and I was pretty pumped to get these shots. Glad you enjoyed the post.

      Like

  13. Gunta says:

    I’m thinking that’s actually a hand-puppet you stuck on a bush to pose for you! 😉 Unless, of course, you can provide a shot of the rather fierce looking creature?

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I’m getting better at ‘hand puppets’ wouldn’t you say:) I actually have a photo of the fierce-looking mother in the nest but I’m saving that one for a different ‘puppet show.’

      Like

  14. anotherday2paradise says:

    Fabulous pics and prose, Lyle. Our kids have it really easy, don’t they? 😀

    Like

  15. toughlittlebirds says:

    Aw, you make it so sad! He just has to sit there and wait for his parents to return with catering, how bad can it be? 🙂 Although the rain does look unpleasant. That’s a great photo!

    At least the eagles get to grow up a bit before launching into the unknown. Imagine being a duckling of one of those tree-nesting duck species: “Hello, you’ve hatched! Now jump 50 feet to the ground.”

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      OK if I was the duckling, I think I would just stay up there. Nature’s ways are not always the most intuitive!

      I like the catering idea. If there is a next time, I’ll have to write the story of the five-star nest with room service. Yes, that could definitely work well.

      Like

  16. caleephotography says:

    Great post, Lyle! Did you climb a tree? 😀

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Glad you enjoyed it. I really wish I had a wild story of climbing dangerously but alas the road was carved out of a side of mountain so it ended up the same height as the nest. It would have never happened otherwise!

      Like

  17. Sue says:

    So I’m guessing you were on a ridge across a valley from this nest, to be able to get eye to eye with the eaglet? Great perspective–and narrative!

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      You’re absolutely right. And to make it even better, there was a road on the side of the mountain! That fortunate perspective was most helpful though the nest was so far away it was a challenge to get reasonable shots in the rain.

      Like

  18. Brian Main says:

    Wow, great photo’s Lyle. Also love the narrative.

    Like

  19. Lavinia Ross says:

    Great narrative and absolutely stunning photos, Lyle! Love it! Where were you when you took this set? I am wondering, right along with Mike, whether you were hanging from a rope or strapped to a nearby tree. Crashing to the rocks below probably happens often enough. We had tree swallows nesting in our shed this summer, and more than one youngster hit the cement floor and died. Another was carted off by a Western Blue Jay and partially eaten. Only one fledged, flying into my leg as he tried to leave the shed. He flew back in and hid among the flower pots. I fished him out, and held him skyward. He then took off in the right direction, flying circles around the parents. They all circled me a few times before disappearing. Good to see at least one make it.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      The marvels of nature never cease to amaze. Given all the obstacles of wild babies it’s surprising enough survive to carry on the next generation but they do unless humans mess things up. That’s a great story you told – it must have felt good to see it fly away.

      I really wish I had a wild story of climbing dangerously but alas the road was carved out of a side of mountain so it ended up the same height as the nest. It would have never happened otherwise!

      Like

  20. naturesnippets says:

    Absolutely amazing pictures!

    Like

  21. The Earth Beneath My Feet says:

    Gorgeous photos, interspaced with the usual creative and witty dialogue Lyle :-0

    Like

  22. Mike Powell says:

    Your narrative is compelling and your images are astounding, Lyle. It’s incredible to an eagle’s nest from that perspective and the eye-to-eye perspective makes this encounter a very personal one (as does you creative exploration of the thoughts and emotions of the young bird). Meanwhile, my imagination is running wild as I try to decide if you were hanging from ropes off the side of a cliff or maybe were strapped to a tall tree to take these amazing photos.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Glad you enjoyed the post. You gave me an idea I hadn’t thot of – to make up an incredible story of how I got to eye level of the nest. As it is in many cases, the truth is much more boring. There is a road conveniently located on the side of the mountain which just happens to be at the same height as the nest.

      Like

  23. Steve Gingold says:

    Ah, you’ve made it easier to comment. 🙂

    I really like the first image. It creates such a great sense of place…height and wilderness in one shot.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Yes, it was a bit of a struggle with this new design but I think most of the bugs are worked out of it now.

      Initially I was disappointed that I couldn’t get any closer to the nest, but it really was in such a grand space that it worked out quite well to show the surrounding area. In hindsight I probably could have taken another shot to show just how high that nest really was.

      Like

  24. Patrizia M. says:

    Bellissimi scatti !!!

    Like

  25. Seenorway says:

    ‘Hungry Bird’? 🙂

    Like

  26. Stephen G. Hipperson says:

    ‘Open your wings! Open your wings!’ 😉

    Like

I'd love to hear what you are thinking ...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s