The edge of bluster

I suspect there is a little of each of us in this bison.

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Open spaces as far as the eye can see in each direction and this bison sits right at the edge of the road.

We were surprised to find him sitting right beside the edge of the road just inches from potential traffic. I decided to stop and take a photo, secretly hoping a car would come from the other direction.

Amusingly a car drove right in front of his face and he didn’t flinch. I had to admire the audacity even if I questioned its purpose! From my non-bison perspective there seemed to be a lot of great spots to lie down that were far better than that one.

As we were driving away, I noticed a large truck heading in our direction. I watched in the rear view mirror. The bison bravely stayed in its spot. However, as soon as the truck passed, it ran off in obvious distress. Apparently the bison had reached the end of its bluster.

The amusing thing is that it had survived the experience and only bolted after the truck was gone. I wonder if there is a moral to the story?

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Latest Comments

  1. artsifrtsy says:

    I encountered a pair of burros once – standing fast on the yellow lines on a curve in the highway. Honking didn’t move them, the rush of oncoming traffic didn’t either. They stayed for about 15 minutes that way and then decided to walk away – odd. I love these shots – you get a sense of expression from the big guy.

    Like

  2. doriswamyganesh says:

    There are similar animals known as Yaks in the higher altitudes of northern India, but they are more black in colour and the build is about the same.Very nice pictures, I must confess.Regards, Ganesh.

    Like

  3. Jeff | Planet Bell says:

    Once when I was hiking in the Wichita Mountains I almost stepped on a Bison who was sleeping under a dead cedar tree. The bison and tree were the same color and I didn’t see him until I was right next to him. He awoke, stared me down as if to charge. (I climbed on a rock in terror)

    Maybe he saw me all along and was just testing himself, pretenting to be asleep. I guess I’ll never know.

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    • Lyle Krahn says:

      That experience would definitely get the adrenaline going. They do have a special way of giving dirty looks. Though I do like your theory of him pretending to sleep!

      Like

  4. caleephotography says:

    Great pictures, especially #2! What an impressive animal, I really hope I get to see a bison one day.. I think maybe he was testing himself, to see how long he could hold out despite his fear of vehicles 😉 At least, he wasn’t laying in the road

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    • Lyle Krahn says:

      That second one is the thotful pose. I think that’s why I like it. I like your idea of testing himself! I hope you get to see a bison someday – they are a unique animal.

      Like

  5. dweezer19 says:

    I’d say he had the stamina of a cat. You know..the “I’ll just pretend it isn’t bothering me until no one is looking…” mentality. But obviously he’s not a kamikaze bison. Not that day anyway. Great photos as always.

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  6. vanbraman says:

    I am thinking of something clever to say about the Bison not being able to handle a big wash, but I can’t seem to find the right words.

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  7. Phil Lanoue says:

    What an experience! Fantastic photos of this magnificent animal.

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    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Yellowstone had so many bison it actually made it harder to come up with a photo that seemed better than ordinary. It really is a magnificent animal – big just like you like them.

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  8. dda53 says:

    It just wanted to see how close it could get to the white line. Good capture!

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  9. Michelle at The Green Study says:

    You know he did it on a dare from some of the other bison. Maybe that road is the Boo Radley house in their neck of the woods. You just didn’t see his buddies farther back from the road. “Dude, he’s totally doin’ it! I can’t believe it. Oh man!” They high-fived hooves and rolled over, sides shaking with raucous bison laughter (I’d really like to hear that!).

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    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I would love to see and hear it! I must say that’s an infinitely most creative response than I expected from this post. I’m still trying to figure out what a bison laugh would sound like after hearing only some disconcerting grunts coming from them.

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  10. Mike Powell says:

    Maybe he wanted to cross earlier, but his horns weren’t working. Sorry, I couldn’t resist. The bison is really impressive looking–he looks like he could do some real damage to a vehicle if someone was unfortunate enough to hit him. I guess I never realized how large their heads are (since I have never seen one in person). The head is enormous. Nice job in capturing his portrait–I especially love that second shot.

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    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I have heard stories of those horns and that big solid head working quite well in damaging vehicles – not exactly a fair fight it turns out. I recall years ago encountering a large bull walking toward us on the middle of the road and he wasn’t too fussed about the niceties of traffic flow! We decided to give him most of the road.

      Those heads seem all out of proportion to the rest of the body. I suppose that’s part of their odd appeal. Glad you enjoyed the photos. I was initially disappointed that I couldn’t crop out the road until I remembered the whole story.

      Like

  11. melodylowes says:

    Hmmm – I wonder if I have ever ‘laid down in traffic’ and then complained about the noise? Good thought for this weekend, when we all have a chance to put life into some sort of clearer perspective in our desire to give thanks… Great shots, btw.

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    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Thanks. Now that you bring it up, I am entirely sure I must have done exactly that. I suppose the trick is not to begrudge the past but try to be aware of the potential in the present. That is a good thot to help with a better perspective on Thanksgiving. I hope you had a great Thanksgiving weekend.

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  12. Deb W. Trotter says:

    I’d say the moral of the story is from your perspective – never forget the potential of the rear view mirror to add something to your story! Very nice photos. 🙂

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      That’s what I like about throwing out questions on the blog. I get an assortment of answers I would never have thot of including yours which was creative and so true. Glad you liked the photos.

      Like

  13. Gunta says:

    Perhaps it took that long for the thought of leaving to get through that thick skull? Great and wonderful pics as always.

    Like

  14. Rick Alonzo Photography says:

    Amazing! I have never seen a bison in person. And I can’t imagine what he was doing so close to the road.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      It’s always interesting to find out the different animals that people see in different parts of the continent. The bison is an unusual one and fun to photograph. I appreciate your comment.

      Like

  15. Pam says:

    What a beauty! Guess the truck was just too darn big.

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  16. Foghorn The IKonoclast says:

    Truly and totally amazing.

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  17. Lakshani Suranga says:

    I guess he wanted to look brave despite the fear. Maybe he was testing himself.

    Like

  18. Honie Briggs says:

    wow. no, WOW.
    The moral of the story…know when it’s time to leave. Good for bison and house guests alike.

    Like

  19. Katalina4 says:

    Oh, he is so very lovely…

    Like

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