Nothing to change here …

“It is the nature of a man as he grows older to protest against change, particularly change for the better.”
John Steinbeck

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This is the amount of blur that I like in the water – enough to give a sense of motion and keep the general outlines of the waves. Once I figured that out there was no reason to change. Right?

Apparently someone snuck in change as a virtue when I wasn’t looking. This isn’t altogether good news for me since there are a few things that I like to keep the same – you know stuff that works. I call it experience. Of course that’s a lot different than being inflexible, much different.

I’m sure there are lots of areas where I’ve changed. I just need a little time to come with examples to prove the point … hmm this really shouldn’t be that difficult …

Wait a minute. The picture above is a great example. Years ago I would see photographs where moving water had been turned to a white blur and I didn’t like the effect at all. It was just too different from what I thot looked good.

However after seeing the effect many times, it started to grow on me. Eventually I ended up liking it. Yes I think this is a wonderful example of how I can be flexible and open to change – even if it is not especially current.

My point is that I can change. I think Red Green said it well, “I’m a man, but I can change, if I have to, I guess.”

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Latest Comments

  1. bruce thomas witzel says:

    Lovely Lyle – thanks for visiting my blog today. I meant to press the follow button yesterday but forgot because i was so engrossed in your story telling and photography. I look forward to more of your blog, though in all honesty I am a bit sporadic, Yes, I can change. . . I guess 🙂

    Like

  2. MJF Images says:

    Rushing water has always fascinated me. Then when I first got to stand beside a really big powerful river and hear and feel the vibration of those boulders rolling along the streambed, I was definitely hooked. I usually like semi-smooth blurred water, thinking it looks most like what I see. Sometimes I like more and sometimes I like to use a very short shutter to freeze it It’s strange to me how some people seem to think short shutter is the “natural” way to shoot flowing water, while blurred/smoothed is an “effect”. When I look at moving water I don’t see the image that a short shutter speed will yield.

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    • Lyle Krahn says:

      That’s an excellent point about what looks natural. I’m convinced that being at the scene and using a few senses to experience it makes us “see” the scene differently and even people standing beside each other may not “see” it the same way.

      Like

  3. Dick Trew says:

    I chuckled when I first read the post. Days later, I’m still chuckling…am I the only one who thought the use of “current” in the discussion of moving water (second last paragraph) could have two meanings, even if unintentionally?

    It seems that portraying water dynamics is one of the tests of an artist. It is such a captivating subject (not unlike fire in its attraction to the human spirit, I think). One thing seems sure–no one water motion image is ever going to capture the final word to the satisfaction of all–there will always be new perspectives, treatments and creative impulses to explore. I really do appreciate your openness in revealing your own processes and reflections! Keep the posts coming…

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Always happy to hear that the humour connected. The double meaning of current was entirely unintentional. Now that you mention it, I should have worked that in better!

      I like your comparison of water to fire. Both have wonderful powers to attract me. And both open up a world of exploration for photography. The fun never stops.

      Like

  4. donna213 says:

    I agree with you. This is a nice look to moving water. I like the wave action as well. Beautiful image.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Thanks. It really is amazing how many different looks a person can make with the camera in the same place and sometimes it’s even hard to figure out which one is a personal favourite. Looking back at my other photos from that day I also notice the water changing course so no two photos are exactly the same. All part of the fun.

      Like

  5. whichwaynow101 says:

    Got to love Red Green, but your first quote captured my attention. It’s so appropriate for me right now.

    Like

  6. Steve Gingold says:

    I have gone through a few changes with water flow and decided to be flexible depending on a few things like volume and speed of flow.
    I have firmly resisted doing swirls but am starting to see that door opening just a crack.
    So far, the biggest change I have noticed is the unfortunate realization that I am older. 🙂

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      It’s interesting to look back and note when ideas were introduced and when or if we changed. Some flexibility to account for the factors involved is usually most helpful. Yes it’s hard not to notice that getting older thing – it tends not to be subtle.

      Like

  7. cuervo says:

    The Possum Lodge came to mind well before reading it at the bottom of your post… chuckle
    Change is the natural order of the Universe, nothing is static. To live life to the fullest and cram as much experience into it as possible, what else is there?
    Wisdom grows along the way, learning which rapids to run and which to portage, stop, look, listen…. then proceed. There is no turning back, only a choice for the way ahead.
    All my outdoor gear use to be discreet earth tones, so as to blend in with the surroundings. Now there are bright reds, yellows, blues and greens so that it’s easier for me to find them….

    Like

  8. Vicki says:

    Change can be good (if it’s for the right reasons).
    Change for the sake of it, OR to follow everyone else’s thought patterns and ideas is not good. I think it curbs creative vision and not just in photography.

    Personally, I like your water movement because it still shows the outline of the wave or course of the water against the rock. I no longer like those cotton wool effects where the wave disappears entirely – mainly because EVERYONE seems to be doing it and thinks because they can do it, it’s wonderful.
    Apart from being relatively new to photography, I still like the whole idea of an image that hasn’t been PP (or PP minimally to enhance what is already a good photo).
    When I can make a really good photo that speaks to the viewer without any PP at all, then and only then, will I consider myself a great photographer.

    Oh……and I’m one of those people who likes water to look like water. I like water to be ‘seen’ and ‘felt’ and ‘heard’ even in a photo.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      You make a good point about following the crowd and curbing creativity. I often find it more interesting to not go where everyone else is going – I suppose it’s that contrarian streak coming through.

      If I could make water to be seen, felt and heard in a photo that would be wildly successful. It’s the movement around the rocks, as you mentioned, that I find so fascinating and want to portray.

      I heartily endorse your dream of becoming a great photographer using minimal processing. Each person needs to decide their own journey and destination. I have found my approach changing over the years. I tend to use more processing now to try to recreate what I saw and felt at the time. Like most things in photography, I only wish I was better at it.

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  9. dapontephotography says:

    Hi Lyle,
    I don’t like to call it change, change is something I carry in my pocket and get rid of as fast as I can. I like to call it growth 🙂 We like what we like and as time goes by we grow as artists and try new techniques. We examine the results and say ehh I liked it better the other way 🙂
    Great photo and thought provoking post.
    -Steve

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Glad you enjoyed the post. In some reflective moments, it’s interesting to look back on my photographic journey and note the changes and twists along the way. It seems a little unpredictable even in hindsight. Growth is a much better way to describe it.

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      • dapontephotography says:

        I have been looking back at photos I shot with my first digital camera a 1999 2.5MP Olympus C-2500L it worked, a lot of digital noise though. Mostly used it for product photography for websites.

        Like

  10. Deb W. Trotter says:

    I feel as long as you’re open to the IDEA of change, you’re then free to embrace or reject any proposed change according to your liking. And of course, we are all capable of recognizing which changes are for the better, right?!

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I like the way you described being open to the idea of change. It reminds me of the advice that we should consider entering every discussion with the possibility that we could be wrong. We are absolutely capable of recognizing changes for the better – the question is do we act on it.

      Like

  11. Mandy says:

    Are you trying to warn us of impending change? Should we be worried?

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      First of all, you should always be worried – I’d hate to go down alone. You are way ahead of me on impending change since I hadn’t even thot about that. Maybe you can tell me what I should change.

      Like

  12. Lavinia Ross says:

    I like the smooth flow of the water in that photo. It’s a beautiful image, almost cirrus cloud-like in the flow formations.

    Like

  13. Sid Dunnebacke says:

    Sit down, sit down. All stand for the Man’s Pledge. Love Red Green. Oh – and that shot is just right.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Ah yes that reminds me that it’s been a long time since I watched that show. Happy to hear from another fan. It definitely had some prize moments. Glad you liked the shot.

      Like

  14. Gunta says:

    I get stuck in ruts and then it’s time to mix it up a bit. I tend to prefer the silky slow shutter look for water falls or cascades like yours (nice shot, BTW)… but freezing the action of frothy ocean surf is a whole lot of fun, too. Much like Phil, I was also looking for a bear hiding somewhere in there. 🙂

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      You are just going to have to look closer for the bear! The beauty of all the options is we can experiment and figure what works for us. Sometimes it’s even hard for me decide what looks better. You are absolutely right about ruts – terrible things – unless of course they are comfortable.

      Like

  15. Patrizia M. says:

    Bellissima immagine!!!

    Like

  16. My Heartsong says:

    Well, I am still chuckling over Red Green’s comment. I have had issues with the flow of water in photos and felt rebellious for a time about always seeing the silky smooth streams of flow, wondering if it was the only way to take photos any more and if it was okay to take a fast shot that freezes the action (did it anyway). I have a photo of a fountain that was only half turned on and tried the silky thing but chose a little faster speed and got positive comments on the one shot that I took that stopped the action and showed curvy arcs of water. I have a shot similar to yours as well, both of which I like.I am a fire sign and like the soothing sound of the flow of water, even when it is a large waterfall that gets loud and displays its power.There is something magnificent about that. I think that it all works, as long as we are open to experimentation, or change.I guess.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Glad you liked Red Green. There’s an art to twisting enough truth into something to make it really funny.

      There are certainly lots of ways to take photos of moving water or anything else for that matter. The beauty of it is that there are no wrong answers only personal taste. I like to experiment with different options and figure what I like and it can change with different scenes. That’s all part of the fun and sometimes frustration.

      Like

  17. Phil Lanoue says:

    I’m not at all good with change, I even buy milk at the same store every time.
    Regarding photography subjects…I still can not say I’m a fan of overdone HDR but who knows? Maybe some day it will hit me and I’ll alter that view. (umm…probably not)
    That being said though, I am a fan of your smooth, rushing water effect in this image and can understand that it may be a departure from your usual stuff. That of course had me looking for just a second expecting to see a bear face peering out from the corner of that water scene.

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      I can’t believe you didn’t see the bear’s nose in the corner! Yes this one is a bit different for me though I used to do them all the time (mental note – another change).

      I’m with you on the strong (I think overdone) HDR. I seem to be seeing more and more of it. In addition to not liking it, I also have a bit of contrarian streak that gets me running in the opposite direction of the crowd. Everyone has to decide for themselves what they like and that is one area where I don’t have a problem.

      I hope your store never runs out of milk!

      Like

      • Phil Lanoue says:

        Ha! They were out of milk two days ago. I just stood there in front of the milk case staring in disbelief at the empty shelf. But I did not go to another store, I’ll just wait ’em out and in the meantime hope I still have enough left for my little bowl of cereal in the morning.

        Like

  18. AmyRose says:

    What an image and the words struck deeply. Thank you for both.

    Like

  19. westerner54 says:

    Time certainly helps with accepting change, I guess…although I’m not totally on board with the changes that time is doing to my knees, or my skin, or my waistline….I do like both Red Green and John Steinbeck quotes in the same post!

    Like

    • Lyle Krahn says:

      Those are two of my favourite quotes. Yes time does help with adjustments but I find aging to be one of the toughest. It’s definitely not for the feint of heart.

      Like

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